How to be the Best at Customer Service

Customer service is often a thankless job that gets a lot of attention if it isn’t performed correctly, but often is unrewarded when performed right. If you want to make an impact on a customer, you need to go above and beyond to provide that experience for them. Here are some tips about how to be the best at customer service:

Smile.

While this seems simple, many people underestimate the value of a smile. Your customers have likely had a stressful day, and just giving them a smile before you interact with them can change their entire mood for the better. Once you have set the mood to provide a good experience, you can move on to some of the other steps that will make you a customer service pro.

Give Them a Compliment.

Give your customers a compliment. Most likely, this will throw them off – many of your customers will be in a hurry or frazzled or in the middle of something else. By giving them a compliment, you are forcing them to be present to reflect on the compliment you have paid them. It’s important that the compliment is not forced or a lie because this will show in the way you deliver your compliment. By delivering a real compliment, you will make their day and encourage them to have a moment of relaxation before heading back into their busy day.

Ask if They Need Help Before They Need It.

The number one way to be a pro at customer service is to anticipate and ask if they need help before they need it. For example, if you see a customer ordering four drinks, go ahead and get out that drink holder for them before they have to come back to you and ask for it. By anticipating the needs of your customer before they realize it, you’re reducing the amount of problems they may have, but you’re also displaying thoughtfulness, which is the hallmark of customer service.

If you’re a customer service pro and are looking for a job in which your talents can be appreciated, contact Award Staffing. We will be able to help you find a job that puts your talents and strengths to good use so you can benefit a company and start helping your new customers.

Hiring Long-Lasting Talent

If it’s your task to hire long-lasting talent, you may feel a bit of internal pressure. Finding great talent to represent your company is hard, and more often than not, jobs are disposable to people as they circle through different phases in their lives. Building a team made up of long-lasting talent has its benefits, however, so here are some tips we have about hiring talent that stays.

Gauge Their Future Plans.

One of the easiest ways to figure out whether or not a recruit could be long-lasting talent is to assess their plans and interest level. First, ask about their plans. Are they just looking for a job while they’re in school or do they plan to move across the country in a few months? They’re not the best bet for a long-term hire. However, if they have plans to stay indefinitely in the area because of family commitments or other personal reasons, this could be a good indicator that they could be long-lasting talent.

Gauge Their Interest Level.

Another easy way to see whether or not talent would be long-lasting is to gauge their interest level. If someone shows up to an interview with a glazed look in their eyes, sloppy attire, and no resume – it’s safe to assume they’re not necessarily interested in the job. Or, maybe they are, but they would jump ship if the right opportunity came up for them. Contrast that with an individual who came into an interview dressed nicely and prepared with a list of questions about your specific interview. Which employee would you hire for long-term talent? The second one, obviously, because they showed a vested interest in your company.

Send a Consistent Message to Your Recruits.

If your job listing is for a “Summer Sales Associate,” but you want to find someone who will work long-term for your company, you’re not sending a consistent message as to who you want to hire. Before you can hire long-lasting talent, you need to make sure the positions for which you are hiring lend themselves to being long-term. If they don’t currently, what steps can you take to make sure you attract long-lasting-minded individuals as opposed to those looking for a short summer gig?

If you are looking for long-term talent for your company but are having a hard time finding them, contact Award Staffing. We will be able to help you figure out which of the potential recruits are in it for the long haul and which of the potential recruits only want a short-term gig.

 

3 Steps You Should Take to Be Promoted

If you have a job you love and have been working at for a while, it makes sense that you may want to see a promotion in your near future. While the decision ultimately rests in the hands of your employer, there are five crucial steps you can take to speed up the process.

Be Early Every Day.

This cannot be stressed enough if you are hoping for a promotion in the near future. Being early every day not only allows you to jump into a situation if needed, but it also shows your level of commitment and dedication to your job. Your employers will start to notice that you are dependable, responsible, and motivated. These are all great traits to have as someone who is about to be promoted.

Go Above and Beyond Your Responsibilities.

In a similar manner to showing up early every day, you should go above and beyond your responsibilities. People who don’t care about work show up, do the bare minimum, and clock out at the end of the day. People who value their jobs and colleagues show up at work, finish their tasks, and ask what else they can do to help their colleagues and the business overall. Not only will you be helping with your company’s productivity, but you will be visibly displaying to your employer that you have a vested interested in doing your job well beyond simply collecting a paycheck and helping the company succeed.

Express the Desire to Be Promoted.

Sometimes, even if you take the above two steps, your manager may not give you a promotion because s/he assumes you don’t want it. If you truly want to be promoted, you need to express the desire to them so they can take it into account. Whether you decide to write a formal letter, an informal e-mail, or have a conversation – that’s up to you. But, it is important that you make your desire and goals heard so they can take them into consideration.

If you have been working at a job that doesn’t allow for promotional opportunities, contact Award Staffing. We can place you in a job that values how hard you work and will give you opportunities based on the desires you express and the commitment you show to that particular company.

 

 

Giving Constructive Criticism

If you’re in a managerial position, you may find yourself in the situation in which you need to give constructive criticism to employees. While constructive criticism is immensely helpful in guiding your employees to perform tasks the way you want, it can often be hard to deliver. Consider these tips on how to give constructive criticism.

Start the Interaction with a Compliment.

The whole point of constructive criticism is that you want your employee to change or modify their behavior to achieve a different result. It’s hard for a person to be receptive to any suggestion if they are on the defense, which is why you need to start the interaction with a compliment. Doing so will let the employee know you value them and their talents, which will make them that much more receptive to the criticism you’re about to deliver.

Deliver the Criticism as an Observation.

Delivering criticism as an observation as opposed to an accusation will keep the employee in the right frame of mind to be receptive to it. For example, there is a huge difference in tone if you say, “I noticed that you missed a few deadlines,” as opposed to “You never meet your deadlines.” Framing the criticism as an observation also shows that you care and have noticed it happening at least once, which makes them feel less accused and more part of a team.

Give a Helpful Suggestion.

If you don’t suggest a remedy or two about how to fix the issue, you’re not delivering constructive criticism – you’re just delivering criticism. Take some time to come up with a few possible solutions before talking to the individual. This will make them feel like they have camaraderie with you and your conversation is less of a scolding and more of collaboration.

Hiring Long Lasting Talent

If it’s your task to hire long-lasting talent, you may feel a bit of internal pressure. Finding great talent to represent your company is hard, and more often than not, jobs are disposable to people as they circle through different phases in their lives. Building a team made up of long-lasting talent has its benefits, however, so here are some tips we have about hiring talent that stays.

Gauge Their plans and Interest Level.

One of the easiest ways to figure out whether or not a recruit could be long-lasting talent is to assess their plans and interest level. First, ask about their plans. Are they just looking for a job while they’re in school or do they plan to move across the country in a few months? They’re not the best bet for a long-term hire. However, if they have plans to stay indefinitely in the area because of family commitments or other personal reasons, this could be a good indicator that they could be long-lasting talent.

Gauge Their Interest Level.

Another easy way to see whether or not talent would be long-lasting is to gauge their interest level. If someone shows up to an interview with a glazed look in their eyes, sloppy attire, and no resume – it’s safe to assume they’re not necessarily interested in the job. Or, maybe they are, but they would jump ship if the right opportunity came up for them. Contrast that with an individual who came into an interview dressed nicely and prepared with a list of questions about your specific interview. Which employee would you hire for long-term talent? The second one, obviously, because they showed a vested interest in your company.

Send a Consistent Message to Your Recruits.

If your job listing is for a “Summer Sales Associate,” but you want to find someone who will work long-term for your company, you’re not sending a consistent message as to who you want to hire. Before you can hire long-lasting talent, you need to make sure the positions for which you are hiring lend themselves to being long-term. If they don’t currently, what steps can you take to make sure you attract long-lasting-minded individuals as opposed to those looking for a short summer gig?

If you are looking for long-term talent for your company but are having a hard time finding them, contact Award Staffing. We will be able to help you figure out which of the potential recruits are in it for the long haul and which of the potential recruits only want a short-term gig.