Star Tribune’s 2019 Top Workplace in Minnesota

Star Tribune Names Award Staffing as a 2019 Top 150 Workplace in Minnesota

Bloomington, MN June 13th, 2019—Award Staffing has been named one of the Top 150 places to work in Minnesota by the Star Tribune for the fourth year in a row. A complete list of those selected is available at StarTribune.com/topworkplaces2019 and was also published in the Star Tribune Top Workplaces special section on Sunday, June 16.

Produced by the same team that compiles the 28-year-old Star Tribune 100 report of the best-performing public companies in Minnesota, Top Workplaces recognizes the most progressive companies in Minnesota based on employee opinions measuring engagement, organizational health, and satisfaction. The analysis included responses from over 140,000 employees at Minnesota public, private and nonprofit organizations.

The rankings in the Star Tribune Top 150 Workplaces are based on survey information collected by Energage, an independent company specializing in employee engagement and retention.

Award Staffing was ranked 59 of 70 on the small company list.

Star Tribune Publisher Michael J. Klingensmith said, “The companies in the Star Tribune Top 150 Workplaces deserve high praise for creating the very best work environments in the state of Minnesota. My congratulations to each of these exceptional companies.”


Why Award Staffing as a Top Workplace in Minnesota?

“Of all the national and local awards we receive, this one is the most important because the judges are our employees. We are honored to be included in the list of Top Workplaces.” – Tom Thissen, Owner, and CEO

We continue to hold firm to our signature approach to service – reinforce connections between the people and the places we serve. Our role is to fulfill gainful employment by serving both job seekers and businesses alike. These awards would not be possible without the efforts of our recruiters, our associates, our clients, and every candidate who has walked through our doors.


To qualify for the Star Tribune Top Workplaces, a company must have more than 50 employees in Minnesota. Over 2,000 companies were invited to participate. Rankings were composite scores calculated purely on the basis of employee responses.

Slips, Trips, and Falls Safety at Work

Slips, Trips, and Falls Safety at Work

Slips, trips, and falls are responsible for many general industry accidents.  They cause 15% of all accidental deaths and are second only to motor vehicles as a cause of fatalities. 65% of fall-related injuries occur as a result of falls from same-level walking surfaces.

Conditions that create slip, trip, and fall hazards include:

• Dry product spills such as dusts, powders, granules and small metal parts
• Highly polished or freshly waxed floors
• Uneven or sloped surfaces
• Transitions from one surface to another (e.g., outdoors to indoors, carpet to vinyl, grid to concrete)
• Unanchored rugs or mats, loose floorboards or steps, missing tiles
• Gravel, grass, leaves, pine needles and other slippery natural materials
• Incorrect use of personal protective gear and fall prevention equipment
• Poor housekeeping such as clutter, obstacles in work areas, open cabinets and desk drawers
• Inadequate or no cautionary signage
• Dim lighting, glare, shadows or misty conditions
• Individual physical factors such as poor eyesight or depth perception; fatigue, dizziness, stress or illness; medication, alcohol and drug effects
• Behavioral factors such as talking on cell phones or eating while walking; hurrying and not paying attention to surroundings; carrying or moving cumbersome or tall objects; taking unsafe shortcuts; being off balance when mounting/dismounting vehicles, equipment, ladders or scaffolding; wearing inappropriate footwear for the conditions or wet, muddy or greasy shoes

 

Precautions and Prevention:

• Practicing good housekeeping
• Keeping floor surfaces clean and dry
• Providing adequate drainage in wet floor locations
• Ensuring wet floor warning signs are posted in and around wet floor locations
• Maintaining clear aisles and passageways
• Ensuring walkway surfaces are in good repair
• Keeping cords and hoses out of the way
• Reporting and cleaning up spills immediately
• Providing non-slip coatings or anti-skid surfaces
• Minimizing matting trip hazards
• Providing adequate lighting in all areas
• Eliminating uneven floor surfaces
• Setting standards for type(s) of footwear to be worn
Training the workforce to take shorter, more vertical steps in tricky spots and to step over obstacles at an angle
• Establishing an “eyes on the path” and no running rule
• Be observant.
• Placement of warning signs or caution tape and cleaning up spills

 

When walking, employees should:

• Wear non-slip shoes or work boots
• Proceed at a reasonable pace and avoid distractions
• Use handrails when going up or down stairs and not skip steps
• Use a flashlight in dimly lit or dark areas
• Use extra caution when walking from one surface to another or when the walking surface is uneven, wet or icy
• Hold small loads close to their body and not carry anything that is too large or bulky to see over or around

 

Good housekeeping practices include:

• Stowing or covering electrical cords, cables, hoses and other trip hazards
• Repairing damaged ladders or steps and uneven walking surfaces
• Ensuring floors are clean, dry and not too slippery
• Closing all drawers and doors that protrude into walkways and aisles
• Installing skid-resistant materials on ramps and other sloped surfaces
• Cleaning up spills following strategic placement of caution signs
• Using moisture-absorbent, slide-proof floor mats, especially at entrances/exits
• Installing adequate lighting in walkways, staircases, ramps, hallways and other work areas

Also review other workplace safety topics here or if you’re looking to hire new employees but don’t know where to start, contact Award Staffing. We will be able to help you find the right employees for your unique business needs.

 

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Every month we will share with you an engaging infographic, designed to catch the attention of workers around that month’s topic.

Utility Knife Safety_ Award Staffing

Utility Knife Safety in the Workplace

Many workers use utility knives to cut drywall, ceiling tile, strapping, puncture shrinkwrap, and open packaging. But one wrong move and these blades can do serious harm. If there is one hand tool that demands your respect over many others in the workplace, a tool that can cut you to the bone in an instant, it’s the utility knife.

In fact, nearly 40 percent of all injuries attributed to manual workshop tools in the US involve utility knives.

Accidents involving utility knives occur for the following reasons:

• Drawing the knife towards you instead of away from your body.
• Working with a dull blade. (Dull blades require more pressure, increasing the potential for injury.)
• Trying to cut more than the knife can handle.
• Improperly storing the knife with the blade extended.
• Failing to wear personal protective equipment.
• Neglecting to inspect the tool before use.
• Blade and tip are left exposed when put away, laid down or put in tool boxes.

Knife Use –

• A knife should be used for cutting and cutting only
• Never use a knife as a screwdriver or prying tool
• Always make cuts away from your body
• Do not use too much pressure to cut
• Never use a defective knife – such as one with a broken handle, blade or lock system
• Always be sure the knife is sharp
• Dull knives lead to injury because more pressure is needed to cut and this can result in slips
• Never throw a knife
• When done with the knife make sure the blade is retracted into the handle.
• Make sure you are using the right knife for the job. A good sharp knife should cut without difficulty, allowing you to get the job done quickly and safely.

Protection –

• If you have to make cuts close to your body, be sure to wear the proper PPE to avoid injury
• Gloves and Kevlar sleeves are available for certain cutting applications

Storage –

• Always carry a knife in its sheath
• Never leave a knife uncovered on a table or workbench
• Always store the knife with the cutting edge down or covered, keep it on the pouch and not exposed.

First Aid –

• Treat even the smallest cut
• Blood Poisoning or infections can develop if cuts are not treated properly

REMEMBER!! Utility knives are extremely handy on the job, but they can also be handy in causing serious injuries. As an employer, please take time to download this informational graphic to generate awareness and prevention of utility knife related injuries.

Also review other workplace safety topics here or if you’re looking to hire new employees but don’t know where to start, contact Award Staffing. We will be able to help you find the right employees for your unique business needs.

 

SUBSCRIBE TODAY

Every month we will share with you an engaging infographic, designed to catch the attention of workers around that month’s topic.

Preventing Heat Stress

Preventing Heat Stress

Effective Ways to Prevent Heat Stress in the Workplace!

Heat stress generally occurs when spending long periods of time outside/inside in excessive heat. Symptoms typically include physical exhaustion, cramping, rashes, and dehydration. In the most severe cases, heat stroke can result in confusion, irrational behavior, loss of consciousness and even death.

Risk Factors for Heat Illness

· High temperature and humidity, direct sun exposure, no breeze or wind
· Heavy physical labor
· Not drinking enough fluids (dehydration)
· Limited air movement
· Bulky or heavy personal protective equipment or clothing
· Radiant heat sources (vehicle and equipment engines, hot manufacturing processes, etc.)
· Physical conditioning and health conditions (e.g., diabetes, cardiovascular disease, influenza, etc.)

Symptoms of Heat Exhaustion

· A headache, dizziness, or fainting
· Weakness and wet skin
· Irritability or confusion
· Thirst, nausea, or vomiting

Heat can also increase the risk of injuries in workers as it may result in sweaty palms, fogged-up safety glasses, and dizziness. Burns may also occur as a result of accidental contact with hot surfaces or steam.

To Prevent Heat Illness:

· Establish a complete heat illness prevention program.
· Provide training about the hazards leading to heat stress and how to prevent them.
· Provide a lot of cold water to workers close to the work area. At least one pint of water per hour is needed.
· Take breaks in more relaxed, shaded areas and rest regularly.
· Use fans or air conditioning to stay cool.
· Use cooling pads that can be inserted into hardhats or around the neck to keep the head and neck cool. Vented hardhats or neckbands soaked in cold water also can be used to minimize prolonged heat exposure and prevent the body from overheating.
· Wear light-colored, loose-fitting, breathable clothing such as cotton.
· To prevent dehydration, another hazard associated with exposure to heat, drink lots of water, about one cup every 15 minutes. Drink cold water and avoid diuretics such as coffee, tea, alcohol or soda, as these can deplete the body of fluid.

 

With outside temperatures and humidity soaring during the summer months, now is the time to make sure employees are taking the steps necessary to protect themselves from heat stress and heat-related illness. As an employer, please take time to download this informational graphic to generate awareness and prevention of serious heat illnesses. Also review other workplace safety topics here or if you’re looking to hire new employees but don’t know where to start, contact Award Staffing. We will be able to help you find the right employees for your unique business needs.

 

SUBSCRIBE TODAY

Every month we will share with you an engaging infographic, designed to catch the attention of workers around that month’s topic.

Avoiding Electrical Accidents in the Workplace

6 Easy Ways to Avoid Electrical Accidents at Work

If you’ve been shocked, burned, or suffered from any sort of injury as a result of electrical hazards at work, your very first step is to search for medical attention. Try to recall, electrical burns are among the most serious injuries you’ll have the ability to receive and needs to be given prompt attention. With care, such accidents are simple to avoid and save plenty of pain.

Today’s employee’s work with or uses electricity directly or indirectly throughout the workday. Since it has become such a familiar part of our daily lives, we tend to overlook the hazards electricity poses.

Preventing Electrical Accidents

Electricity can Shock, Burn, and Cause Fires or Explosions. Your body can easily conduct electricity. Avoid electrical accidents by doing the following;

· Inspect electrical equipment before use.
· Check that plugs have a good, tight connection.
· Never bend pronged plugs.
· Don’t touch anything electrical with wet hands or while standing in water.
· Don’t use metal tools or metal hard hats around electricity.
· Use insulated tools.

Award Staffing wants to help you keep your workplace safe. Please download our free informational flier for avoiding electrical accidence. Also review other workplace safety topics here or if you’re looking to hire new employees but don’t know where to start, contact Award Staffing. We will be able to help you find the right employees for your unique business needs.

 

SUBSCRIBE TODAY

Every month we will share with you an engaging infographic, designed to catch the attention of workers around that month’s topic.

Star Tribune's 2017 Top 150 Workplace

Star Tribune’s 2018 Top Workplace in Minnesota

Award Staffing Named One of Star Tribune’s Top Places to Work in Minnesota

Bloomington, MN June 25th, 2018—Award Staffing has been named one of the Top 150 places to work in Minnesota by the Star Tribune. A complete list of those selected is available at StarTribune.com/topworkplaces2018 and was also published in the Star Tribune Top Workplaces special section on Sunday, June 24.

Top Places to Work In Minnesota

Top Places to Work In Minnesota

Produced by the same team that compiles the 27-year-old Star Tribune 100 report of the best-performing public companies in Minnesota, Top Workplaces recognizes the most progressive companies in Minnesota based on employee opinions measuring engagement, organizational health, and satisfaction. The analysis included responses from over 71,000 employees at Minnesota public, private and nonprofit organizations.

The rankings in the Star Tribune Top 150 Workplaces are based on survey information collected by Energage, an independent company specializing in employee engagement and retention.

Award Staffing was ranked 31 of 70 on the small company list.

Star Tribune Publisher Michael J. Klingensmith said, “The companies in the Star Tribune Top 150 Workplaces deserve high praise for creating the very best work environments in the state of Minnesota. My congratulations to each of these exceptional companies.”


Why Award Staffing as a Top Place to Work in Minnesota?

Over 30 years ago Award Staffing started with only one office and a couple of team members with a signature approach; providing its clients with unsurpassed service and their associates with the clear career path, all the while serving the communities in which we work and live.

Today, Award Staffing has grown to a nationally recognized staffing agency with six locations all throughout the Twin Cities. Even though times have changed, their approach to service with a local focus has not. By using innovating technologies and processes, they have been able to grow the quality of service that has made us a premier staffing company.


To qualify for the Star Tribune Top Workplaces, a company must have more than 50 employees in Minnesota. Over 2,400 companies were invited to participate. Rankings were composite scores calculated purely on the basis of employee responses.